Category Archives: Videos

Video Conferencing in HTML5: WebRTC via

Six months ago I experimented with Web sockets for WebRTC and the early implementations of PeerConnection in Chrome. Last week I gave a presentation about WebRTC at, so it was time to update that codebase.

I decided to use for the signalling following the idea of Luc, which made the server code even smaller and reduced it to a mere reflector:

 var app = require('http').createServer().listen(1337);
 var io = require('').listen(app);

 io.sockets.on('connection', function(socket) {
         socket.on('message', function(message) {
         socket.broadcast.emit('message', message);

Then I turned to the client code. I was surprised to see the massive changes that PeerConnection has gone through. Check out my slide deck to see the different components that are now necessary to create a PeerConnection.

I was particularly surprised to see the SDP object now fully exposed to JavaScript and thus the ability to manipulate it directly rather than through some API. This allows Web developers to manipulate the type of session that they are asking the browsers to set up. I can imaging e.g. if they have support for a video codec in JavaScript that the browser does not provide built-in, they can add that codec to the set of choices to be offered to the peer. While it is flexible, I am concerned if this might create more problems than it solves. I guess we’ll have to wait and see.

I was also surprised by the need to use ICE, even though in my experiment I got away with an empty list of ICE servers – the ICE messages just got exchanged through the server. I am not sure whether this is a bug, but I was very happy about it because it meant I could run the whole demo on a completely separate network from the Internet.

The most exciting news since my talk is that Mozilla and Google have managed to get a PeerConnection working between Firefox and Chrome – this is the first cross-browser video conference call without a plugin! The code differences are minor.

Since the specification of the WebRTC API and of the MediaStream API are now official Working Drafts at the W3C, I expect other browsers will follow. I am also looking forward to the possibilities of:

The best places to learn about the latest possibilities of WebRTC are and the W3C WebRTC WG. has open source code that continues to be updated to the latest released and interoperable features in browsers.

The video of my talk is in the process of being published. There is a MP4 version on the Linux Australia mirror server, but I expect it will be published properly soon. I will update the blog post when that happens.

Video Conferencing in HTML5: WebRTC via Web Sockets

A bit over a week ago I gave a presentation at Web Directions Code 2012 in Melbourne. Maxine and John asked me to speak about something related to HTML5 video, so I went for the new shiny: WebRTC – real-time communication in the browser.

Presentation slides

I only had 20 min, so I had to make it tight. I wanted to show off video conferencing without special plugins in Google Chrome in just a few lines of code, as is the promise of WebRTC. To a large extent, I achieved this. But I made some interesting discoveries along the way. Demos are in the slide deck.

UPDATE: Opera 12 has been released with WebRTC support.

Housekeeping: if you want to replicate what I have done, you need to install a Google Chrome Web Browser 19+. Then make sure you go to chrome://flags and activate the MediaStream and PeerConnection experiment(s). Restart your browser and now you can experiment with this feature. Big warning up-front: it’s not production-ready, since there are still changes happening to the spec and there is no compatible implementation by another browser yet.

Here is a brief summary of the steps involved to set up video conferencing in your browser:

  1. Set up a video element each for the local and the remote video stream.
  2. Grab the local camera and stream it to the first video element.
  3. (*) Establish a connection to another person running the same Web page.
  4. Send the local camera stream on that peer connection.
  5. Accept the remote camera stream into the second video element.

Now, the most difficult part of all of this – believe it or not – is the signalling part that is required to build the peer connection (marked with (*)). Initially I wanted to run completely without a server and just enter the remote’s IP address to establish the connection. This is, however, not a functionality that the PeerConnection object provides [might this be something to add to the spec?].

So, you need a server known to both parties that can provide for the handshake to set up the connection. All the examples that I have seen, such as, use a channel management server on Google’s appengine. I wanted it all working with HTML5 technology, so I decided to use a Web Socket server instead.

I implemented my Web Socket server using node.js (code of websocket server). The video conferencing demo is in the slide deck in an iframe – you can also use the stand-alone html page. Works like a treat.

While it is still using Google’s STUN server to get through NAT, the messaging for setting up the connection is running completely through the Web Socket server. The messages that get exchanged are plain SDP message packets with a session ID. There are OFFER, ANSWER, and OK packets exchanged for each streaming direction. You can see some of it in the below image:

WebRTC demo

I’m not running a public WebSocket server, so you won’t be able to see this part of the presentation working. But the local loopback video should work.

At the conference, it all went without a hitch (while the wireless played along). I believe you have to host the WebSocket server on the same machine as the Web page, otherwise it won’t work for security reasons.

A whole new world of opportunities lies out there when we get the ability to set up video conferencing on every Web page – scary and exciting at the same time!

Recent developments around WebVTT

People have been asking me lots of questions about WebVTT (Web Video Text Tracks) recently. Questions about its technical nature such as: are the features included in WebVTT sufficient for broadcast captions including positioning and colors? Questions about its standardisation level: when is the spec officially finished and when will it move from the WHATWG to the W3C? Questions about implementation: are any browsers supporting it yet and how can I make use of it now?

I’m going to answer all of these questions in this post to make it more efficient than answering tweets, emails, and skype and other phone conference requests. It’s about time I do a proper post about it.


I’m starting with the last area, because it is the simplest to answer.

No, no browser has as yet shipped support for the <track> element and therefore there is no support for WebVTT in browsers yet. However, implementations are in progress. For example, Webkit has recently received first patches for the track element, but there is still an open bug for a WebVTT parser. Similarly, Firefox can now parse the track element, but is still working on the element’s actual functionality.

However, you do not have to despair, because there are now a couple of JavaScript polyfill libraries for either just the track element or for video players with track support. You can start using these while you are waiting for the browsers to implement native support for the element and the file format.

Here are some of the libraries that I’ve come across that will support SRT and/or WebVTT (do leave a comment if you come across more):

  • Captionator – a polyfill for track and SRT parsing (WebVTT in the works)
  • js_videosub – a polyfill for track and SRT parsing
  • jscaptions – a polyfill for track and SRT parsing
  • LeanBack player – a video player with track and SRT, SUB, DFXP, and soon full WebVTT parsing support
  • playr – a video player that includes track and WebVTT parsing
  • MediaElementJS – a video player that includes track and SRT parsing
  • Kaltura’s video player – a video player that includes track and SRT parsing

I am actually most excited about the work of Ronny Mennerich from LeanbackPlayer on WebVTT, since he has been the first to really attack full support of cue settings and to discuss with Ian, me and the WHATWG about their meaning. His review notes with visual description of how settings are to be interpreted and his demo will be most useful to authors and other developers.


Before we dig into the technical progress that has been made recently, I want to answer the question of “maturity”.

The WebVTT specification is currently developed at the WHATWG. It is part of the HTML specification there. When development on it started (under its then name WebSRT), it was also part of the HTML5 specification of the W3C. However, there was a concern that HTML5 should be independent of the chosen captioning format and thus WebVTT currently only exists at the WHATWG.

In recent months – and particularly since browser vendors have indicated that they will indeed implement support for WebVTT as their implementation of the <track> element – the question of formal standardization of WebVTT at the W3C has arisen. I’m involved in this as a Google contractor and we’ve put together a proposed charter for a WebVTT Working Group at the W3C.

In the meantime, standardization progresses at the WHATWG productively. Much feedback has recently been brought together by Ian and changes have been applied or at least prepared for a second feature set to be added to WebVTT once the first lot is implemented. I’ve captured the potentially accepted and rejected new features in a wiki page.

Many of the new features are about making the WebVTT format more useful for authoring and data management. The introduction of comments, inline CSS settings and default cue settings will help authors reduce the amount of styling they have to provide. File-wide metadata will help with the exchange of management information in professional captioning scenarios and archives.

But even without these new features, WebVTT already has all the features necessary to support professional captioning requirements. I’ve prepared a draft mapping of CEA-608 captions to WebVTT to demonstrate these capabilities (CEA-608 is the TV captioning standard in the US).

So, overall, WebVTT is in a great state for you to start implementing support for it in caption creation applications and in video players. There’s no need to wait any longer – I don’t expect fundamental changes to be made, but only new features to be added.

New WebVTT Features

This takes us straight to looking at the recently introduced new features.

  • Simpler File Magic:
    Whereas previously the magic file identifier for a WebVTT file was a single line with “WEBVTT FILE”. This has now been changed to a single line with just “WEBVTT”.
  • Cue Bold Span:
    The <b> element has been introduced into WebVTT, thus aligning it somewhat more with SRT and with HTML.
  • CSS Selectors:
    The spec already allowed to use the names of tags, the classes of <c> tags, and the voice annotations of <v> tags as CSS selectors for ::cue. ID selector matching is now also available, where the cue identifier is used.
  • text-decoration support:
    The spec now also supports the CSS text-decoration property for WebVTT cues, allowing functionality such as blinking text and bold.

Further to this, the email identifies the means in which WebVTT is extensible:

  • Header area:
    The WebVTT header area is defined through the “WEBVTT” magic file identifier as a start and two empty lines as an end. It is possible to add into this area file-wide information header information.
  • Cues:
    Cues are defined to start with an optional identifier, and then a start/end time specification with “–>” separator. They end with two empty lines. Cues that contain a “–>” separator but don’t parse as valid start/end time are currently skipped. Such “cues” can be used to contain inline command blocks.
  • Inline in cues:
    Finally, within cues, everything that is within a “tag”, i.e. between “”, and does not parse as one of the defined start or end tags is ignored, so we can use these to hide text. Further, text between such start and end tags is visible even if the tags are ignored, so wen can introduce new markup tags in this way.

Given this background, the following V2 extensions have been discussed:

  • Metadata:
    Enter name-value pairs of metadata into the header area, e.g.

    00:00:15.000 --> 00:00:17.950
    first cue
  • Inline Cue Settings:
    Default cue settings can come in a “cue” of their own, e.g.

    DEFAULTS --> D:vertical A:end
    00:00.000 --> 00:02.000
    This is vertical and end-aligned.
    00:02.500 --> 00:05.000
    As is this.
    DEFAULTS --> A:start
    00:05.500 --> 00:07.000
    This is horizontal and start-aligned.
  • Inline CSS:
    Since CSS is used to format cue text, a means to do this directly in WebVTT without a need for a Web page and external style sheet is helpful and could be done in its own cue, e.g.

      STYLE -->
      ::cue(v[voice=Bob]) { color: green; }
      ::cue(c.narration) { font-style: italic; }
      ::cue(c.narration i) { font-style: normal; }
      00:00.000 --> 00:02.000
      <v Bob>Welcome.
      00:02.500 --> 00:05.000
      <c .narration>To <i>WebVTT</i>.
  • Comments:
    Both, comments within cues and complete cues commented out are possible, e.g.

     COMMENT -->
     00:02.000 --> 00:03.000
     two; this is entirely
     commented out
     00:06.000 --> 00:07.000
     this part of the cue is visible
     <! this part isn't >
     <and neither is this>

Finally, I believe we still need to add the following features:

  • Language tags:
    I’d like to add a language tag that allows to mark up a subpart of cue text as being in a different language. We need this feature for mixed-language cues (in particular where a different font may be necessary for the inline foreign-language text). But more importantly we will need this feature for cues that contain text descriptions rather than captions, such that a speech synthesizer can pick the correct language model to speak the foreign-language text. It was discussed that this could be done with a <lang jp>xxx</lang> type of markup.
  • Roll-up captions:
    When we use timestamp objects and the future text is hidden, then is un-hidden upon reaching its time, we should allow the cue text to scroll up a line when the un-hidden text requires adding a new line. This is the typical way in which TV live captions have been displayed and so users are acquainted with this display style.
  • Inline navigation:
    For chapter tracks the primary use of cues are for navigation. In other formats – in particular in DAISY-books for blind users – there are hierarchical navigation possibilities within media resources. We can use timestamp objects to provide further markers for navigation within cues, but in order to make these available in a hierarchical fashion, we will need a grouping tag. It would be possible to introduce a <nav> tag that can group several timestamp objects for navigation.
  • Default caption width:
    At the moment, the default display size of a caption cue is 100% of the video’s width (height for vertical directions), which can be overruled with the “S” cue setting. I think it should by default rather be the width (height) of the bounding box around all the text inside the cue.

Aside from these changes to WebVTT, there are also some things that can be improved on the <track> element. I personally support the introduction of the source element underneath the track element, because that allows us to provide different caption files for different devices through the @media media queries attribute and it allows support for more than just one default captioning format. This change needs to be made soon so we don’t run into trouble with the currently empty track element.

I further think a oncuelistchange event would be nice as well in cases where the number of tracks is somehow changed – in particular when coming from within a media file.

Other than this, I’m really very happy with the state that we have achieved this far.

HTML5 multi-track audio or video

In the last months, we’ve been working hard at the WHATWG and W3C to spec out new HTML markup and a JavaScript interface for dealing with audio or video content that has more than just one audio and video track.

This is particularly relevant when a Web page author wants to add a sign language track to a video or audio resource for deaf people, or an audio description track (i.e. a sound track in which a speaker explains the key things that can be seen on screen) for blind people. It is also relevant when a Web page author wants to publish a video with multiple audio tracks that are each a different language dub for the video and can be used for less common cases such as a director’s comment track, or making available different camera angles for an event.

Just to be clear: this is not a means to introduce video editing functionality into the Web browser. If you want to do edits, you’re better off with an application that will eventually render a new piece of content and includes fancy transitions etc. Similarly, this is not a means to introduce mixing functionality (as in what DJs do when they play with multiple audio recordings). You’re better off with an actual audio mixing or DJ application that will provide you all sorts of amazing effects and filters.

So, multi-track is squarely focused on synchronizing alternative or additional tracks to a single resource with a single timeline to which all tracks are slaved.

Two means of publishing such multi-track media content are possible:

  • In-band multi-track
  • Synchronized resources

1. In-band multi-track

In in-band multi-track, there is a single file that has all all the tracks inside it. For this single file, there is now an API in HTML5 that allows addressing and controlling these tracks.

Of the video file formats that Web browsers support, WebM is currently not defined to contain more than one audio or video track. However, since WebM is using the Matroska container format, which supports multi-track, it is possible to extend WebM for multi-track resources. I have seen multitrack Ogg, MP4 and Matroska files in the wild and most media players support their display.

The specification that has gone into HTML5 to support in-band multi-track looks as follows:

interface HTMLMediaElement : HTMLElement {
  // tracks
  readonly attribute AudioTrackList audioTracks;
  readonly attribute VideoTrackList videoTracks;

interface AudioTrackList : EventTarget {
  readonly attribute unsigned long length;
  getter AudioTrack (unsigned long index);
  AudioTrack? getTrackById(DOMString id);

           attribute EventHandler onchange;
           attribute EventHandler onaddtrack;
           attribute EventHandler onremovetrack;

interface AudioTrack {
  readonly attribute DOMString id;
  readonly attribute DOMString kind;
  readonly attribute DOMString label;
  readonly attribute DOMString language;
           attribute boolean enabled;

interface VideoTrackList : EventTarget {
  readonly attribute unsigned long length;
  getter VideoTrack (unsigned long index);
  VideoTrack? getTrackById(DOMString id);
  readonly attribute long selectedIndex;

           attribute EventHandler onchange;
           attribute EventHandler onaddtrack;
           attribute EventHandler onremovetrack;

interface VideoTrack {
  readonly attribute DOMString id;
  readonly attribute DOMString kind;
  readonly attribute DOMString label;
  readonly attribute DOMString language;
           attribute boolean selected;

You will notice that every audio and video track gets an index to address them. You can enable and disable individual audio tracks (via the enabled attribute) and you can select a single video track for display (via the selectedIndex attribute). This means that one or more audio tracks can be active at the same time (e.g. main audio and audio description), but only one video track will be active at a time (e.g. main video or sign language).

Through the id, kind, label and language attributes you can find out more about what actual content is available in the individual tracks so as to activate/deactivate them correctly and display the right information about them.

kind identifies the type of content that the track exposes such as “description” (for audio description), “sign” (for sign language), “main” (for the default displayed track), “translation” (for a dubbed audio track), and “alternative” (for an alternative to the default track).

label provides a human readable string that describes the content of the track aiming to be used in a menu.

id provides a short machine-readable string that can be used to construct a media fragment URI for the track. The use case for this will be discussed later.

language provides a machine-readable language code to identify which language is spoken or signed in an audio or sign language video track.

Example 1:

The following uses a video file that has a main video track, a main audio track in English and French, and an audio description track in English and French. (It likely also has caption tracks, but we will ignore text tracks for now.) This code sample switches the French audio tracks on and all other audio tracks off.

<video id="v1" poster=“video.png” controls>
 <source src=“video.ogv” type=”video/ogg”>
 <source src=“video.mp4” type=”video/mp4”>

<script type="text/javascript">
video = document.getElementsByTagName("video")[0];

for (i=0; i < video.audioTracks.length; i++) {
  if (video.audioTracks[i].language.substring(0,2) === "fr") {
    video.audioTracks[i].enabled = true;
  } else {
    video.audioTracks[i].enabled = false;

Example 2:

The following uses a audio file that has a main audio track in English, no main video track, but sign language video tracks in ASL (American Sign Language), BSL (British Sign Language), and ASF (Australian Sign Language). This code sample switches the Australian sign language track on and all other video tracks off.

<video id="a1" controls>
 <source src=“audio_sign.ogg” type=”video/ogg”>
 <source src=“audio_sign.mp4” type=”video/mp4”>

<script type="text/javascript">
video = document.getElementsByTagName("video")[0];

for (i=0; i< video.videoTracks.length; i++) {
  if (video.videoTracks[i].language === 'sgn-asf') {
    video.videoTracks[i].selected = true;
  } else {
    video.videoTracks[i].selected = false;

If you have more tracks in both examples that conflict with your intentions, you may need to further filter your activation / deactivation code using the kind attribute.

2. Synchronized resources

Sometimes the production process of media creates not a single resource with multiple contained tracks, but multiple resources that all share the same timeline. This is particularly useful for the Web, because it means the user can download only the required resources, typically saving a substantial amount of bandwidth.

For this situation, an attribute called @mediagroup can be added in markup to slave multiple media elements together. This is administrated in the JavaScript API through a MediaController object, which provides events and attributes for the combined multi-track object.

The new IDL interfaces for HTMLMediaElement are as follows:

interface HTMLMediaElement : HTMLElement {
  // media controller
           attribute DOMString mediaGroup;
           attribute MediaController? controller;

enum MediaControllerPlaybackState { "waiting", "playing", "ended" };
interface MediaController : EventTarget {
  readonly attribute unsigned short readyState; // uses HTMLMediaElement.readyState's values

  readonly attribute TimeRanges buffered;
  readonly attribute TimeRanges seekable;
  readonly attribute unrestricted double duration;
           attribute double currentTime;

  readonly attribute boolean paused;
  readonly attribute MediaControllerPlaybackState playbackState;
  readonly attribute TimeRanges played;
  void pause();
  void unpause();
  void play(); // calls play() on all media elements as well

           attribute double defaultPlaybackRate;
           attribute double playbackRate;

           attribute double volume;
           attribute boolean muted;

           attribute EventHandler onemptied;
           attribute EventHandler onloadedmetadata;
           attribute EventHandler onloadeddata;
           attribute EventHandler oncanplay;
           attribute EventHandler oncanplaythrough;
           attribute EventHandler onplaying;
           attribute EventHandler onended;
           attribute EventHandler onwaiting;

           attribute EventHandler ondurationchange;
           attribute EventHandler ontimeupdate;
           attribute EventHandler onplay;
           attribute EventHandler onpause;
           attribute EventHandler onratechange;
           attribute EventHandler onvolumechange;

You will notice that the MediaController replicates some of the states and events of the slave media elements. In general the approach is that the attributes represent the summary state from all the elements and the writable attributes when set are handed through to all the slave elements.

Importantly, if the individual media elements have @controls activated, then the displayed controls interact with the MediaController thus allowing synchronized playback and interaction with the combined multi-track object.

Example 3:

The following uses a video file that has a main video track, a main audio track in English. There is another video file with the ASL sign language for the video, and an audio file with the audio description in English. This code sample creates controls on the first file, which then also control the audio description and the sign language video, neither of which have controls. Since the audio description doesn’t have controls, it doesn’t get visually displayed. The sign language video will just sit next to the main video without controls.

<video id="v1" poster=“video.png” controls mediagroup="a11y_vid">
 <source src=“video.webm” type=”video/webm”>
 <source src=“video.mp4” type=”video/mp4”>

<video id="v2" poster=“sign.png” mediagroup="a11y_vid">
 <source src=“sign.webm” type=”video/webm”>
 <source src=“sign.mp4” type=”video/mp4”>

<audio id="a1" mediagroup="a11y_vid">
 <source src=“audio.ogg” type=”audio/ogg”>
 <source src=“audio.mp3” type=”audio/mp3”>

Example 4:

We now accompany a main video with three sign language video tracks in ASL, BSL and ASF. We could just do this in JavaScript and replace the currentSrc of a second video element with the links to BSL and ASF as required, but then we need to run our own media controls to list the available tracks. So, instead, we create a video element for each one of the tracks and use CSS to remove the inactive ones from the page layout. The code sample activates the ASF track and deactivates the other sign language tracks.

  video.inactive { display: none; }

<video id="v1" poster=“video.png” controls mediagroup="a11y_vid" class="inactive">
 <source src=“video.webm” type=”video/webm”>
 <source src=“video.mp4” type=”video/mp4”>

<video id="v2" poster=“sign_asl.png” mediagroup="a11y_vid" >
 <source src=“sign_asl.webm” type=”video/webm”>
 <source src=“sign_asl.mp4” type=”video/mp4”>

<video id="v3" poster=“sign_bsl.png” mediagroup="a11y_vid" class="inactive">
 <source src=“sign_bsl.webm” type=”video/webm”>
 <source src=“sign_bsl.mp4” type=”video/mp4”>

<video id="v4" poster=“sign_asf.png” mediagroup="a11y_vid" class="inactive">
 <source src=“sign_asf.webm” type=”video/webm”>
 <source src=“sign_asf.mp4” type=”video/mp4”>

<script type="text/javascript">
videos = document.getElementsByTagName("video");

for (i=0; i < videos.length; i++) {
  if (videos[i].currentSrc.match(/asf/g).length > 0) {
    videos[i].class = "";
  } else {
    videos[i].class = "active";

Example 5:

In this final example we look at what to do when we have a in-band multi-track resource with multiple video tracks that should all be displayed on screen. This is not a simple problem to solve because a video element is only allowed to display a single video track at a time. Therefore for this problem you need to use both approaches: in-band and synchronized resources.

We take a in-band multitrack resource with a main video and audio track and three sign language tracks in ASL, BSL and ASF. The second resource will be made up from the URI of the first resource with a media fragment address of the sign language tracks. (If required, these can be discovered using the getID() function on the first resource.) The markup will look as follows:

<video id="v1" poster=“video.png” controls mediagroup="a11y_vid">
 <source src=“video.ogv#track=v_main&track=a_main” type=”video/ogv”>
 <source src=“video.mp4#track=v_main&track=a_main” type=”video/mp4”>

<video id="v2" poster=“sign.png” controls mediagroup="a11y_vid">
 <source src=“video.ogv#track=asl&track=bsl&track=asf” type=”video/ogv”>
 <source src=“video.mp4#track=asl&track=bsl&track=asf” type=”video/mp4”>

Note that with multiple video elements you can always style them in the way that you want them displayed on screen. E.g. if you want a picture-in-picture display, you scale the second video down and absolutely position it on top of the first one in the appropriate location. You can even grab the second video into a canvas, chroma-key your sign language speaker on a green or blue screen and remove that background through some canvas processing before popping it on top of the video.

The world is all yours!

HOWEVER: There is one big caveat on all these specs – while they have all found entry into the HTML5 specification, it would be expecting a bit much to have browser support already. 🙂

UPDATE 23 July 2014: I’ve just changed this to use the latest spec, which should also at least partially be implemented already.

WordPress plugin for external videos updated

Over the last weeks I’ve updated my “external videos” wordpress plugin. I’ve fixed bugs and added some new functionality.

List of changes:

  • fixed a bug in attaching blog posts to videos for link-through from gallery overlays
  • allow re-attaching a different blog post to a video
  • added a shortcode that allows to link straight through to video pages instead of the overlay
  • fixed a bug on retrieval of keyframe for dotsub
  • added option to add the video posts to the site’s RSS feed
  • fixed a bug on image paths for the thickbox
  • made sure whenever a user goes to the admin page that the cron hook is active
  • changed some class names to avoid clashes with other plugins that people reported
  • turned simple_html_dom code into a class of its own to avoid clashes with other plugins that use this code, too
  • cleaning up entered data from surplus white space
  • styling fixes to the overlay on gallery
  • shielding against a bug with no videos on channels to retrieve yet

Download the new plugin version 0.13

Note: there is something weird going on with the wordpress plugins site, which still shows version 0.7 as the current one, but when you download it, it gets the latest version 0.12. If somebody knows how to fix this, that would be awesome. I think it also stops people from auto-updating this plugin, which is sad with this many improvements.
(I think I fixed it by actually changing the version number in the external-videos.php file – how silly of me – and thanks to the WordPress Forum person who pointed it out to me! Download 0.13 now.)

WebVTT explained

On Wednesday, I gave a talk at Google about WebVTT, the Web Video Text Track file format that is under development at the WHATWG for solving time-aligned text challenges for video.

I started by explaining all the features that WebVTT supports for captions and subtitles, mentioned how WebVTT would be used for text audio descriptions and navigation/chapters, and explained how it is included into HTML5 markup, such that the browser provides some default rendering for these purposes. I also mentioned the metadata approach that allows any timed content to be included into cues.

The talk slides include a demo of how the <track> element works in the browser. I’ve actually used the Captionator polyfill for HTML5 to make this demo, which was developed by Chris Giffard and is available as open source from GitHub.

The talk was recorded and has been made available as a Google Tech talk with captions and also a separate version with extended audio descriptions.

The slides of the talk are also available (best to choose the black theme).

I’ve also created a full transcript of the described video.

Get the WebVTT specification from the WHATWG Website.

Ideas for new HTML5 apps

At the recent Linux conference in Brisbane, Australia, I promised a free copy of my book to the person that could send me the best idea for an HTML5 video application. I later also tweeted about it.

While I didn’t get many emails, I am still impressed by the things people want to do. Amongst the posts were the following proposals:

  • Develop a simple video cutting tool to, say setting cut points and having a very simple backend taking the cut points and generating quick enough output. The cutting doesn’t need to retranscode.
  • Develop a polyfill for the track element
  • Use HTML5 video, especially the tracking between video and text, to better present video from the NZ Parliament.
  • Making a small MMO game using WebGL, HTML5 audio and WebSockets. I also want to use the same code for desktop and web.

These are all awesome ideas and I found it really hard to decide whom to give the free book to. In the end, I decided to give it to Brian McKenna, who is working on the MMO game – simply because it it is really pushing the boundaries of several HTML5 technologies.

To everyone else: the book is actually not that expensive to buy from APRESS or Amazon and you can get the eBook version there, too.

Thanks to everyone who started really thinking about this and sent in a proposal!

Talk at Web Directions South, Sydney: HTML5 audio and video

On 14th October I gave a talk at Web Directions South on “HTML5 audio and video – using these exciting new elements in practice”.

I wanted to give people an introduction into how to use these elements while at the same time stirring their imagination as to the design possibilities now that these elements are available natively in browsers. I re-used some of the demos that I have put together for the book that I am currently writing, added some of the cool stuff that others have done and finished off with an outlook towards what new features will probably arrive next.

“Slides” are now available, which are really just a Web page with some demos that work in modern browsers.

Table of contents:

HTML5 Audio and Video

  1. Cross browser <video> element
  2. Cross browser <audio> element
  3. Encoding
  4. Fallback considerations
  5. CSS and <video> – samples
  6. <video> and the JavaScript API
  7. <video> and SVG
  8. <video> and Canvas
  9. <video> and Web Workers
  10. <video> and Accessibility
  11. audio plans