Media Fragment URI Specification in Last Call WD

After two years of effort, the W3C Media Fragment WG has now created a Last Call Working Draft document. This means that the working group is fairly confident that they have addressed all the required issues for media fragment URIs and their implementation on HTTP and is asking for outside experts and groups for input. This is the time for you to get active and proof-read the specification thoroughly and feed back all the concerns that you have and all the things you do not understand!

The media fragment (MF) URI specification specifies two types of MF URIs: those created with a URI fragment (“#”), e.g. video.ogv#t=10,20 and those with a URI query (“?”), e.g. video.ogv?t=10,20. There is a fundamental difference between the two that needs to be appreciated: with a URI fragment you can specify a subpart of a resource, e.g. a subpart of a video, while with a URI query you will refer to a different resource, i.e. a “new” video. This is an important difference to understand for media fragments, because only some things that we want to achieve with media fragments can be achieved with “#”, while others can only be achieved by transforming the resource into a different new bitstream.

This all sounds very abstract, so let me give you an example. Say you want to retrieve a video without its audio track. Say you’d rather not download the audio track data, since you want to save on bandwidth. So, you are only interested to get the video data. The URI that you may want to use is video.ogv#track=video. This means that you don’t want to change the video resource, but you only want to see the video. The user agent (UA) has two options to resolve such a URI: it can either map that request to byte ranges and just retrieve those – or it can download the full resource and ignore the data it has not been requested to display.

Since we do not want the extra bytes of the audio track to be retrieved, we would hope the UA can do the byte range requests. However, most Web video formats will interleave the different tracks of a media resource in time such that a video track will results in a gazillion of smaller byte ranges. This makes it impractical to retrieve just the video through a “#” media fragment. Thus, if we really want this functionality, we have to make the server more intelligent and allow creation of a new resource from the existing one which doesn’t contain the audio. Then, the server, upon receiving a request such as video.ogv#track=video can redirect that to video.ogv?track=video and actually serve a new resource that satisfies the needs.

This is in fact exactly what was implemented in a recently published Firefox Plugin written by Jakub Sendor – also described in his presentation “Media Fragment Firefox plugin”.

Media Fragment URIs are defined for four dimensions:

  • temporal fragments
  • spatial fragments
  • track fragments
  • named fragments

The temporal dimension, while not accompanied with another dimension, can be easily mapped to byte ranges, since all Web media formats interleave their tracks in time and thus create the simple relationship between time and bytes.

The spatial dimension is a very complicated beast. If you address a rectangular image region out of a video, you might want just the bytes related to that image region. That’s almost impossible since pixels are encoded both aggregated across the frame and across time. Also, actually removing the context, i.e. the image data outside the region of interest may not be what you want – you may only want to focus in on the region of interest. Thus, the proposal for what to do in the spatial dimension is to simply retrieve all the data and have the UA deal with the display of the focused region, e.g. putting a dark overlay over the regions outside the region of interest.

The track dimension is similarly complicated and here it was decided that a redirect to a URI query would be in order in the demo Firefox plugin. Since this requires an intelligent server – which is available through the Ninsuna demo server that was implemented by Davy Van Deursen, another member of the MF WG – the Firefox plugin makes use of that. If the UA doesn’t have such an intelligent server available, it may again be most useful to only blend out the non-requested data on the UA similar to the spatial dimension.

The named dimension is still a largely undefined beast. It is clear that addressing a named dimension cannot be done together with the other dimensions, since a named dimension can represent any of the other dimensions above, and even a combination of them. Thus, resolving a named dimension requires an understanding of either the UA or the server what the name maps to. If, for example, a track has a name in a media resource and that name is stored in the media header and the UA already has a copy of all the media headers, it can resolve the name to the track that is being requested and take adequate action.

But enough explaining – I have made a screencast of the Firefox plugin in action for all these dimensions, which explains things a lot more concisely than word will ever be able to – enjoy:

And do not forget to proofread the specification and send feedback to public-media-fragment@w3.org.

2 thoughts on “Media Fragment URI Specification in Last Call WD

  1. “Then, the server, upon receiving a request such as video.ogv#track=video can redirect that to video.ogv?track=video and actually serve a new resource that satisfies the needs. This is in fact exactly what was implemented in a recently published Firefox Plugin written by Jakub Sendor”

    This text is slightly confusing. The “#track=video” fragment string is stripped by the browser, and never received by the server. The Firefox plugin gets the information to the server by adding a track specifier header in the GET request, as required by the Media Fragments spec.

    1. Ben, you are right. I didn’t want to go into all detail with the description, but indeed: URI fragments (‘#’) are not ever sent to the server – instead, the MF WG has decided to transfer the information of the URI fragment in HTTP headers.

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